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H. G. Wells

Books

The First Men in the Moon by H. G. Wells

When penniless businessman Mr. Bedford retreats to the Kent coast to write a play, he meets by chance the brilliant Dr. Cavor, an absentminded scientist on the brink of developing a material that blocks gravity. Cavor soon succeeds in his experiments, only to tell a stunned Bedford that the invention makes possible one of the oldest dreams of humanity: a journey to the...

The Island of Dr Moreau by H. G. Wells

The narration of Edward Prendick, a shipwrecked man rescued by a passing boat who is left on the island home of Doctor Moreau, who creates sentient beings from animals via vivisection. The novel deals with a number of philosophical themes, including pain and cruelty, moral responsibility, human identity, and human interference with nature.

The Shape of Things To Come by H. G. Wells

When a diplomat dies in the 1930s, he leaves behind a book of "dream visions" he has been experiencing, detailing events that will occur on Earth for the next 200 years. This fictional account of the future proved prescient in many ways, as Wells predicts events such as World War II, the rise of chemical warfare, and climate change.

The Time Machine by H. G. Wells

The book's protagonist is an English scientist and gentleman inventor living in Richmond, Surrey, identified by a narrator simply as the Time Traveller. The narrator recounts the Traveller's lecture to his weekly dinner guests that time is simply a fourth dimension, and his demonstration of a tabletop model machine for travelling through it. He reveals that he has built a...